Sunday, February 27, 2011

Latest bloom day post ever!


A perfect storm of bad weather, depressing national and international news, and mid-winter doldrums has made it difficult to get excited about plants the past few weeks.


But then I started thinking about the few things that do cheer me up during this dreary time. The plants I grow and force during winter are near the top of that list. In the larger scheme of things, a few hyacinths and tazettas, a couple pots of African violets, a bunch of foliage plants, and a lemon tree prone to scale are not that spectacular. When spring comes, I will likely start neglecting my house plants, but right now they keep me occupied—especially the bulbs.


There are two hyacinths from Old House Gardens starting to bloom now: the Double Hollyhock and King of the Blues. DH is very slow to bloom, and opens from the bottom up, just like a real hollyhock. The KOTB looks like it will be a very deep blue—gorgeous.


A Plant Cam has been trained on these for the past few weeks. When all the hyacinths are open, it will record the tulips—I have about 50 of those coming next.

Better late than never for GBBD.

7 comments:

Carol said...

Indeed better late than never. That hollyhock-like hyacinth looks very pretty and I hope it has a fragrance to match.

I look forward to seeing your plant cam videos.

Lisa at Greenbow said...

Of course it is better late than never. These blooms are worth the wait. I hope you are feeling a bit more chipper now.

Rhonda said...

You just made an early Spring for me. Thanks for sharing those beautiful photos!!!

Laura W said...

That Hollyhock Double Hyacinth looks like quite a knockout!

Anonymous said...

It must smell great in your house!!!

Darla said...

What a great hyacinth! Oh, the fragrance must be wonderful in there....

Annie in Austin said...

Even though I have a couple of hyacinths blooming outside, still envy you the scent, EAL... so dry and windy I can't catch the fragrance here. Good luck with King of the Blues being really blue!

Annie at the Transplantable Rose