Saturday, October 31, 2009

This is the end, my friends


For the next few months, I can ignore the weather. Which is a relief in many ways. There may be snow, there may be sleet, there may be ice—or it might just be dreary and gray, but I don’t really have to think much about it, other than dress and travel appropriately. I don’t have to focus on how weather effects or does not affect what I’m doing in the garden, because I won’t be doing much out there, not until April or thereabouts.


There are still a few bulbs to plant, and quite a few leaves to rake. For as long as I can remember, the Norway maples on our street have hung onto their leaves well into November, making leaf disposal an annoying task—much of which takes place the following spring. But this year, there was an early frost and the leaves actually did what they’re supposed to do—change color to a rusty gold and fall off the branches. I think this is the first time I’ve seen their fall color; normally they morph into a greenish black. They’re very pretty, and they’re everywhere.

I already have my first few containers of tazettas started; with any luck, some may be in bloom by Thanksgiving. I will also be spending a lot of time tending indoor plants and dealing with 40-plus pots and vases of forced hyacinths. The weather outside will soon be frightful, but I can ignore it—and continue gardening.

17 comments:

Kathy said...

You grow, girl! Oops, someone else already has that line. I'm glad you figured out how to garden 365.

Sarah from Toronto Gardens said...

Mirror image of weather/leaf conditions in Toronto. We have tons of Norway maples on our street too, one huge on in front of my house- leaves are hanging on for dear life. It is always the last one to give up its leaves, and they are still green. Lots of raking in future.

I can also relate to that spring raking. Or when the snow falls before you get the last batch of leaves. Particularly annoying when you are trying to shovel snow, and your shovel keeps hitting that wad of frozen leaves!

flowergardengirl said...

Gardening Geek posted this on twitter and my heart skipped a beat. I thought you were dying. Shew---now that I have recovered....this is a good post and I know your gardens live on!!!

Yvonne @ Country Gardener said...

I'm with you, isn't it great that we can just pack it away for awhile. I still have a few leaves to chop up with the mower, but that's it. Hurrah for the cosy months.

Susan aka Miss R said...

I never thought about winter in those terms. When designing a garden for my Z6 clients, I always think about what it will look like in the snow--even if we get less and less of it each year. I dread the ice storms and what the do to trees, but welcome snow cover as a preventative to frost heave. What I dread is the darkness. I need light.

Rose said...

I was a little concerned when I saw your title, Elizabeth! But I agree, in some ways it's almost a relief. I still have lots of uncompleted fall projects, but if I don't get them done...well, there's always spring:)

Sue Swift said...

You frightened me too. thought you were going to stop blogging ... Glad to know you're only talking about the end of the year :) And yay for bulbs - which will keep us all going till spring.

Jean said...

I can understand the relief that comes with your weather change. I sometimes wish for that too but it never quite does that down south. Although I prefer the warmer weather, I'm envious of your time to dream of greater gardens.

Lisa at Greenbow said...

Yes, this is what I look forward to every winter. A little time to focus on other things. Being able to dream more about the garden rather than keep after it. A wonderful time of year.

danger garden said...

Wow I wish I could take that stance. Stop watching/worrying about the weather, now is when I get started doing that. I guess it's my own fault (the zonal denial thing) but winter for me means how cold is it going to be tonight and how much rain (too much!) are we getting? I watch so I know what plants I have to protect. Your way certainly sounds smarter...

Carol said...

Time to say goodnight to the gardens... yes here too... I am impressed with your 40 something pots of forced hyacinths. The fragrance will be delicious. Happy last minute gardening. Carol

jodi (bloomingwriter) said...

Forty+ pots of hyacinths? Wow, it's going to be glorious in your house despite whatever the weather throws at you this year. I don't have anything like that but I do have a few pots done up and waiting to cheer us come the bleak midwinter.

Ms. Wis./Each Little World said...

No pots of bulbs here, but we are equally glad to be near the day when we can forget about the garden til next Spring. Frankly, I don't think I could take it all year round. I like knowing I get a break. Plus, having designed our garden to look good in winter, it is nice to be able to enjoy those views and know that no watering or pruning or other jobs are required to make it look good — just a little snow.

Gail said...

Sometimes I envy you northern gardeners the decent break from gardening;) Our first light frost is arriving tonight. gail

Cindy, My Corner of Katy said...

We're a good six weeks away from any significantly cold temperatures and the weather has been glorious this week. I'm more than making up for your lack of time outside!

Blackswamp_Girl said...

I really look forward to your forced bulb show during the winter, Elizabeth... I'm too lazy to do some up for myself, so enjoying them vicariously is particularly lovely. :)

Kaarina said...

nice to be packing it in and taking a nice moment to REST!