Thursday, November 13, 2008

Think autumnal


Think Persuasion, one of my favorite Austen novels (given that there are no non-favorite Austen novels). All the flashy part of the autumn is over. It’s cold or at least chilly most of the time and the light is grayer. It rains a lot. It’s windy and daylight is just about over by the time I get home, weekdays.


Yet, I sat contentedly on the side steps the other day, having just managed to squeeze another few packs of bulbs into the ground, and I felt very good about the garden. Sure, much of it is brown and dead-looking. But you can still see structure and potential. At this time of year, I appreciate the evergreen groundcover in the front; it’s not my favorite plant, but it looks fresh.


Blooms? Not many. I took in a few of the rose buds, because they would be much happier opening inside than out. Some diascia and lobelia is still hanging on—and sure, the toad lily is in bloom. A couple dahlias. Meh.


Blooms are not what it’s about. It’s about setting the stage for the spring, getting excited about bulbs (especially bulb forcing, especially in the forcing glasses, above), and thinking about plants and gardening. And trying to find some decent lighting for my plant room so I can do better with my overwintering. And even though I still I may still clear out one more bed before Thanksgiving, it's really about next year's flowers, not now.


The 2008 garden is over. On with the 2009 GWI garden.

13 comments:

Carol said...

Good point about this part of fall is really about getting ready for spring. It is over, isn't it?

Let's not look back, except to learn, let's look foward to the next gardening season "the best one yet"!

Lisa at Greenbow said...

You are quite right EAL. This is a time when we look forward to spring, plan for spring and begin waiting for spring.

Colleen said...

Very true, EAL---I know I'm already in that mode of going through my books and catalogs, making lists for what to order for next year, and looking at the garden to see what can be improved. It gets us through the winter, doesn't it?

Oh, and I'm with you about Jane Austen novels---there are no non-favorites, but if there were, "Persuasion" would be right up there.

Leslie said...

Wow...those roses are lovely! And I'm looking forward to photos of the blooms in those so very pretty glasses.

Mr. McGregor's Daughter said...

I love Diascia! I meant to look for the new hardy one this year, but I got sidetracked. Then I failed to get even a tender one. They're such great little plants, blooming so late & pairing off nicely with just about anything.
I'm looking forward to the new gardening season too. It helps that I found my Galanthus were sprouting.

MA said...

Those roses are so lovely, and so very rose-like. Old fashioned. MMMMM.

Dee/reddirtramblings said...

Amen to that, Elizabeth. It's all about structure and thinking of spring while enjoying the final fruits, eh?~~Dee

Gail said...

A good point! I just recently realized that I am ready for a bit of a rest...time to read and plan....but while I was moving leaves around I saw the many sprouted money plant, phacelia and other biennials and knew that next spring was going to be wonderful.

Gauil

Layanee said...

Still life in a vase is what you've got with that rose shot. Hang on to those blooms!

Ms. Wis./Each Little World said...

As a former Buffalonian and now a Wisconsinite, the garden looks pretty much the same in both locations in November. (But it is sunnier here, on average). I must admit that at this point I'm ready for a break from the physical work of gardening. Now I'm ready to go mental: reading, thinking, list-making, dreaming. And perhaps now there will be time for some Austen as well. (I blogged about an excellent new book about Jane Austen's garden that might interest you. It ran on Oct. 21).

Blackswamp_Girl said...

Nice post... and I love the beautiful blue of those forcing vases. Even before the hyacinths sprout, it's a lovely visual.

EAL said...

Thanks Each Little World--I will check out the Austen post!

Kim, I am hoping to post soon about all my vintage hyacinth vases. I bought some new ones this year.

Annie in Austin said...

The forced bulbs are always charming on your blog, EAL - it's something I don't do but like to see someone else do!

Maybe if our summers were not so brutal I'd be happy to say "Come on frost - end the garden", but we haven't had much time to enjoy being outside this year so I'm hoping we'll be spared for awhile.

On the other hand, clear signs that the 2009 garden is done must make life simpler! Frost may take the annuals but the leaves are already up on the paperwhites, hopelessly blurring the boundaries of the seasons.

Annie at the Transplantable Rose

(I love Sense & Sensibility, and was ridiculously pleased to have Elinor Dashwood turn up as my Austin heroine on one of those quiz-things.)