Monday, June 16, 2008

Name this rose


Ok, now that I have more readers, I am wondering if one of you can ID this mystery rambler. It was on the property when we bought it, and was referred to as a tea rose by my neighbor—I am pretty sure that is not an accurate description. It has a semi-double form and starts out a deep pink, lightening as it ages. There are many, many buds on each stem.


It’s also a very thorny rose and seems to love neglect. When I cut a few sprays, they tend to wilt easily. There is a small amount of rebloom. Of course, you really never get all that much rebloom from most roses, except the modern shrubby ones.


Oh right, scent—a mild, peppery fragrance.


I wouldn’t say it’s driving me crazy, exactly, but I would like to know what this is.

72 comments:

I Really Ought To Be Doing Something Else... said...

It could be a "knock-out" rose. I'm not sure if that's the true name for this type of flower, but that's what they are called in the South!

Norman Rogers said...

I don't want to alarm you, but the possibility that you have a hybrid flowering plant on your property might be the answer.

In my neighborhood, we have identified several cross-bred plants and hybrids that are a little bit out of the norm, and that's because--I'm not making this up--a researcher and professor at Johns Hopkins University was known for dabbling in homologous recombination in flowers, rather than in crops. He's dead now, but many of his plants live on, year after year.

I would tread carefully around the plant and make note of any mutations or irregularities--you make have a rare hybrid on your hands that you could propagate on your own.

EAL said...

Interesting, Norman!

It is not a Knock-Out, i really ...

Knock-outs have a shorter shrubby habit, and much better rebloom.

Rainy said...

Try contacting the local Botanical Gardens in your area. They will be able to assit you. If you are unable to do so send a photo to The New York Botanical Gardens located in both Brooklyn and the Bronx. They will respond.

have a good season while gardening.

Theresa said...

"A rose by any other name would smell as sweet" -Shakespeare

Maria said...

I think this is the Sweet Briar Rose.

Rosam Que Meruit Ferat!

Tracey H. Kitts said...

I agree with Maria. I think this might be a Sweet Briar ... or perhaps an Apothecary's Rose.

Veronica Speedwell said...

I love roses but my property doesn't get enough sunlight to grow them. :( I am planning a trip to Buffalo this summer. I will check out the Buffalo and Erie County Botanical Gardens.

J. P. Smith said...

what is your favorite alcoholic beverage to consume while you are gardening?

EAL said...

Veronica, you should visit during Garden Walk, if possible. gardenwalkbuffalo.com


Rainy and Theresa, I have considered Sweet Briar.

JP, I don't actually drink while gardening--the name is explained in a post--it is the first one under "perennial posts"

Anonymous said...

[Sorry about the anonymous post, but for some reason my ID isn't being recognized.]

My memory may be off, being about 25 years old from a "complete rose book" that I lost in 1986, but it looks like one of the native American wild tea roses that so struck my fancy in its pages. However, I don't recall anything about the wild varieties having a semi-double form. Perhaps it's an old-fashioned hybrid?

You didn't mention the age of your home or property in this entry, but I recall many backyards in my childhood filled with old-fashioned ornamentals that thrived on neglect. It made perfect sense, because ordinary women back then were too busy tending to life's necessities (including kitchen gardens) to have time for nurturing fussy plants.

Also, I remember taking household refuse to the trash burner at the very back of the lot -- it was a metal basket with a heavy lid, into which we put brown grocery bags full of garbage. Not everyone burned their trash everytime they took it out -- sometimes it might sit for days in the burner (I don't know why). As you can imagine, the refuse "pit" got quite stinky, whether trash sat for days or while it burned. Maybe that's why that part of everyone's backyard was "privacy screened" with aromatic flowering vines and bushes.

Good luck in your search for an answer - I look forward to checking back to see what you've found.

donde esta es, Ya basta said...

rose hip wine is excellent . i think its right up your alley . you should go there...

http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/reques46.asp

naohama said...

We call this rose : Nesri - Tea rose , we - in Libya - use its dried buds in tea .
I have linked your blog to mine as one of my favorites.
Laila Neihoum

Gardener said...

I would like to have roses like this in my garden.

Cramsy (Chris) said...

What a blog title!
Love your style keep it up=]

http://cramsysreviews.blogspot.com/

NEARBYTREE said...

I can see by checking just now on the internet that there is a new rose called the Alexandra Rose - but your photo looks exactly like the rose that we had growing around our front window in the 1950's - and everyone referred to it as the 'Alexandra' rose. This stuck in my mind as my name is Andrina - but was shortened by the family to 'Andra' - so I always thought of the rose as mine!

Katrina said...

It looks like either an apothecary rose or an anemone rose.
you can look at pictures at http://oldroses.co.uk
=)

Denise said...

At one time I had a plant which resembled your rose by my front steps. (however, over the years it has not flourished) at the time I bought the house the previous owner referred to it as a tea rose. But as I read the post from tracey h. kitts, the name "sweet Briar" seems to be a more fitting name for it.

Lisa said...

This looks like William Baffin climbing rose. I have one of these in my yard. It blooms just once per year, in June. It's extrememly prolific and gets huge.

Anonymous said...

Hello,
Very nice Blog you have here!

NicolaMay__ said...

I have a rose very similar in terms of flower shape, but its not the same. My mother reckons yours is a rambler, and this site could help!

http://www.classicroses.co.uk/

Owlfarmer said...

From your pictures, it looks like a plain old rosa rugosa, or wild rose. I grew some on a fence about 30 years ago and they may still be there.

As always, Wikipedia has an article:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rugosa_Rose

Kat said...

I don't know but I defiantly have those in my house...they are really pretty flowers!

ErinT Fashion Accessories said...

I can't offer any help, but I think it's beautiful!

EAL said...

I think it is the American Pillar or the blush rambler. It's not a rugosa--doesn't have the correct hips, which is what they're known for.

Robj98168 said...

I would venture to guess it is some form of wildrose. I have a wildrose bush growing here and cannot get rid of it~!

wiwin said...

i like your blog....keep good works!

mk said...

looks like a nearly wild, only they have single flowers.

Jean said...

Ha, all the plants still alive in my yard thrive on neglect! I haven't seen your precise rose before, but from what you describe, it bears a striking resemblance to the "wild rose" that my mom planted years ago in our Denver, Colorado yard. I don't know much about gardening, but I think that we might have similar climates. Our wild rose really is wild. It's a very thorny, stubborn rose with about the same smell that your has, and although it doens't quite bloom as dark as yours, it does start out dark pink and then fade, with many buds on each stem.

Does your rose seem to sprout up new stalks (right term?) from the ground? Ours exploded from a small plant to having some kind of presence in more than 9 square feet of evergreen shrub/aspen grove, like the invasive weed it probably once was. We let it do that (and have been neglecting that area ever since--gives a nice natural look to things), but sometimes it will sprout up a stalk in a spot we don't want. When it does, cutting that stalk to the ground seems to stop it continuing to spread in that area. Does yours do that?

I don't know whether ours would climb or not, since we've never asked it to.

Seeing as my mom go the "wild rose" plant from Ace Hardware, I'm guessing that it wouldn't be too uncommon. The similarity of our plants lends creedence to one anonymous poster's suggestion that it might be an old-fashioned wild tea rose. I woulnd't know the technical name of our plant, though.

Secrets said...

I dont have a green thumb. Its more like a brownish beige.

All the plants at my house committed suicide.

With regards to your question....I am able to differentiate between grass and flowers and thats about it. So I can say that those are definitively flowers.

PRETTY FLOWERS.

Laura said...

Haha, I loved your blog title so much, I called my mom immediately to share it. I'll be checking back often!

wlbramlett said...

My grandmother has those --- she called them an old fashioned wild roses. (Granny probably named them "old fashioned" because her mother and grandmother had them in their yards, too....)

Camald said...

Hmm... Its very hard to be able to name a rose without an ID!! poop this always happens to me too.. I lose the tag, and then can't reffer to it by name!!

Well its nice anyways!!
Great photography too!!

Cam

Bernie Berlin said...

Just found your blog by accident and LOVE it!!!
I have a big garden and have just come across the strangest bugs that are eating my tomatos.. Needless to say I am hand picking them, don't like pesticides:)
They look like a mutated ladybug, with spots on their sides..
Just moved to the south a few years ago and am going to try my hand at some roses next year, so your blog is quite inspiring!!

karen said...

that looks lie the ROse of Sharon I've that bush growing in my yard!

LJ said...

Have you plugged the above suggestions into
http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/index.php

? I think they have logged every rose ever named. Good luck! It's a beautiful rose.

Big Mac said...

This IS a 'Coredendenciou' Rose from North Africa it dosent need much care so it's all goos

Anonymous said...

Check the Georgia State Flower The Cherokee Rose . It really looks like it and it grows wild and tame both and also a few of the flowers look like the old fashioned 7 sisters fence rose.

Good luck

Betty Beer & Veronica Vodka said...

Hey, you aren't even drunk, are you..?
I personally like to garden naked.

jerryma said...

tea rose or wild rose is what it looks like to me...i don't know any other name

LEXI BUG said...

WOW! i dont know what flower this is but it is really pretty!

Greg said...

Only newly arrived to roses myself. I know what I like, but I know fairly few of them by name. This one's pretty...enjoy!

Definition: The Mellyn said...

My mother has it planted in her back yard. Originally planted by my great-grandmother. That is called a wild, or tea rose. They need no fuss, they are beautiful to smell, and they do not do well in the house cut.

Hers look EXACTLY like those pictures!

Sister Mary Martha said...

As long as it smells like a rose. There is no reason to keep these unfragrant new types. A real rose smells like Mary herself has just arrived.

T-sight said...

They are all over my neighborhood in CT by the Long Island Sound...will reply tomorrow...asking neighbors!

The Rural Rector said...

My first visit, Elizabeth - just discovered your blog! I'm a clumsy, always learning from my mistakes, lover of my garden on the eastern tip of Long Island, New York. You have given me much to read!

EAL said...

Thanks so much to all for your suggestions. I guess it is my obsessive nature that demands an answer to this mystery. But really, it won't change anything about how I like the rose.

The main practical outcome would be to tell people where to buy it if they wanted.

How interesting that others call it tea rose. It doesn't conform to that definition at all if you look at the books.

Martha Marshall said...

I've always heard those were wild roses and also tea roses. I see several people have guessed that name. But you can buy wild roses, just like Jean said.

I'm in Florida, and used to have a nice rose garden. But our soil tends to hold too much moisture in the summers and we have the same problems you're having with yours. Still, there's nothing like wonderful fresh-cut roses in the house.

Bobbi's Book Nook said...

This looks like a rose I have, called "Nearly Wild Rose". It's a cross between a hybrid and a climber and it reblooms throughout the season.

Marilyn said...

Looks like a double Nootka Rose. I've seen this bush at Van Dusen Gardens, Vancouver BC Canada. I remember it well because I photographed it and later rendered it in watercolour.

Check Van Dusen Gardens, Vancouver. If you go to Vancouver, BC be sure to include this public garden on your itinerary. It's much more beautiful and natural than Buchard Gardens in Victoria. Van Duseun has an outstanding sculpture garden as well.

Jamie Jamison Adams said...

Lisa suggested it that it is a 'William Baffin' Rose and Bobbi's Book Nook suggested a 'Nearly Wild' Rose. I would have to agree with Lisa. We have grown both at our garden and nursery center and the way you describe the thorns it sounds more like a 'William Baffin'. In fact that was my first thought when I saw the picture and before I read the post.

Abby said...

You are having us on, right?

American Pillar is surely well known enough.
Nice gimmick.

Radigunde said...

I grew up with this rose all around us and we can still buy it in the nursery under the title "Fairy rose." Blooms all the time and the rose itself is very old!

Sycamore Boutique & Scent Shop said...

I have that exact same rose, we planted it 10 or 12 years ago.
Of course we lost the tag/stake but as close as we can remember the dealer (local nursery selling at the flea market)had tagged it as an "English Wild Rose".

I just ran and picked the last two remaining blooms (for this round anyway)to hold up to the screen for comparison.

Looks nearly identical, magenta pink more single than semi-double, deep yellow stamens and a barely visible white heart. Wonderfully spicy "wild rose" fragrance.

I remember the truly wild roses of childhood being called Marsh Roses - as that is where they would flourish - and this is pretty similar rose but with a bigger, frillier bloom.

The American Pillar mentioned looks lighter and says it flowers late Summer, whereas these are already done flowering for the first time.

I just found your blog this am and love it. Love all the great posts with helpful links too, saved for future reference.

Angela
The Sycamore Boutique & Scent Shop
(not gardening related but a great place for fragrance junkies )

Jeanne said...

Looks very much like my "wild Alberta rose" which I grew from seed & cuttings. Spreads quite nicely if you don't watch it and, yes, is very thorny

Keysmike said...

Greetings from across the "Pond"!
I chanced upon your blog through "Blogs of note", drawn - of course - by its very attractive title. And what a treat!

Anyway, to the point: my father (who sadly passed away in 2005, aged almost 92)spent his entire working life as a roseman on plant nurseries around our home in Cheshire, UK. In my youth (many moons ago!) I used to spend my school- and university vacations assisting him with such activities as budding (ie grafting varieties onto root stock). I have a distant recollection of a rambler named "American Pillar" that used to be grown. I've just checked on Google images and it does indeed look very much like the one in your post.

I would say yours is almost certainly not a rugosa type. If I remember correctly, not only do they have large hips but their leaves are matt - not glossy - and both leaves and stems are considerably rougher and coarser than the ones in your photo.

I'm sorry to "ramble on" (pun intended), but I hope you found it useful. By the way, I'm not a professional gardener like my Dad was, although I still have a keen interest, time allowing. So please don't rely on my suggestion!

One of my regrets, having grown up surrounded by roses, is that in our house (into which we moved 20 years ago) there's hardly a one. Ah well, maybe this correspondence will inspire me to rush out and stock up with our national flower!

Meanwhile, do keep up with your excellent blog.

All the very best,

Mike Wilding, Knutsford, UK

Anonymous said...

nice blog I found. Looks like a Rugosa, I sold them at a store I worked at. It's a shrub rose and grows like mad here!

desdemona said...

why, it's a wild alberta rose!

Leah said...

My brother is a wildlife area manager and horticulturist. I have these in my backyard, which used to be a fenceline in a huge field of corn and soybean. Farmers used these as a way to separate fields without all the maintenance of fences, and they spread like crazy from bird droppings.

He said that it's a "floribunda" rose, and indeed, loves to do it's own thing.

alittlebitofscrap said...

I don't know if anyone has stated it... but that looks like what we call a Sitka rose. Here in AK they grow wild every where, are very fragrant and very thorny, but very pretty :)

Ginger said...

wild rose is the name of it

Joseph Paul said...

Excellent hybrid Rose. It creeps right? Wonderful if you can create a hanging basket for them.

Do you collect seeds and sell them? I love flower garden and do collect seeds.

King family said...

I have a rose with only five petals on it. Looks so similar to that name a rose one. I only know the rose is old. I don't take care of it and it does well on its own.

Seacat said...

I've always heard those called bush roses..? I have no idea what the actual name is, but we have them everywhere in my area.

Anonymous said...

I will say it's hard to tell from the picture. But from the scent and flower and even the foliage --- it appears to me to be Common Beach Rose (Rosa Rugosa)

laura said...

this looks like my betty prior rose bush, which is very thorny and hardy!

rubybaby said...

www.flickr.com/photos/heylisa/595692272/

i saw a simliar picture here.. maybe you guys can figure out..

they are beautiful either way..

good luck!

rubybaby said...

www.ces.ncsu.edu/.../roses/sweetbrierrose.htm

I also found this..

a sweet briar rose is more simple- maybe it's a hybrid w/close relation.

Anonymous said...

Looks like a rose on www.easyelegance.com
Botanical Name: Rosa BAIrage
Common Name: All the Rage, Easy Elegance
I have one planted in my front yard. Purchased from Southwood Nursery in Tulsa, Oklahoma

----t h rive---- said...

NOOTKA ROSE

http://ghs.gresham.k12.or.us/science/ps/nature/gorge/5petal/rose/rosa/nrose.htm

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