Tuesday, September 25, 2007

Tazettas must be chilled? Who knew?


As I’ve never bothered to read the “planting and care” section of the Old House Gardens website, they kindly quoted it to me when I emailed them about forcing their tazettas (recommended for zone 8 and higher gardens). I figured I could force them in a vase of pebbles as I do paperwhites, with no chilling period. Four to six weeks, and I’d have flowers.

Oops, guess not. I have purchased Early Pearl and Grand Primo, and it looks like they will need chilling and maybe also need to be planted in soil, not pebbles. And I’ll have to wait for the bulbs to read the full instructions. A new forcing adventure! I wanted to try these because I’m always looking for variety in paperwhites, having become bored with the common Ziva early on, What is the difference between tazattas and paperwhites? I thought there was none. Huh. I’ll have to make room for these among the 40 or so hyacinths I’ll be forcing this year.

8 comments:

Annie in Austin said...

Good luck with forcing them, EAL. Some of the tazetta narcissus are recommended for the Central Texas landscape, including 'Grand Primo. The tazettas are pretty reliable here, EAL, while the lovely large flowered daffodils grown in the North usually give up after a year or two.

I received prechilled paperwhites as a gift a few years ago, and after they bloomed planted them outside. They rebloomed in 2006 and 2007, but don't seem to increase.

Annie at the Transplantable Rose

kate said...

I didn't know that Tazettas required chilling. I love them and hope you post the full instructions.

I'd love to see them ... as well as the hyacinths when they are in bloom!

Carol said...

Forcing 40 hyacinths? That's a lot. I thought I had a lot with 10. Are you putting them all in vases?

Carol at May Dreams Gardens

EAL said...

Hi Carol,

I am putting a bunch in small pots, to give as gifts. Only 8 or so will be in vases. I may pot up 15 or so in larger pots to bring outside in the spring, as I do with tulips.

Sad truth--they tend to happier in dirt than water.

Layanee said...

We'll all be looking forward to seeing your forced bulb selections! I can just about smell those hyacinths! Is it Easter already?

Rosengeranium said...

Good luck!

M Sinclair Stevens (Texas) said...

Hmmm. I always thought the point of the old-fashioned paperwhites was that they didn't require chilling and bloomed nicely in southern gardens where their other daffodils cousins fail. I have N. italicus and Grand Primo in the ground and they bloom fine without any fuss. On the other hand the Chinese Sacred Lilies have not and this year I dug them up so that I could chill them and see if that helps.

Scott Ogden mentions that paperwhites often need to be reset because they put their energies into offsetting rather than flowering when they are too shallow. I don't see where he mentions anything about a requirement for chilling. I may be reading carelessly.

EAL said...

Well, but my indoor temps may be too high and the humidity too low for these to work in pebbles like the common Ziva (which I don't much care for) does.

Even in Texas, you would have lower night temps etc. I guess what I'm saying is a spare room in Buffalo isn't the same as a backyard in the south.

I dunno. I'll let you know what the label says when I get these. I'm psyched though.