Tuesday, April 10, 2007

THE POND!! The Pond! The pond?



It's funny how when you type a word many times, it doesn't look like a real word anymore. So it is with our pond—purely an abstract concept so far.

Today, Ben of Beautiful River landscaping came by. The myth is that the word "Buffalo" came from beau fleuve, beautiful river. This is probably not true. But Ben is real. He thinks a pond can become a reality, but at the possible risk of the trellis and vines that will surround it. So we'll see what happens.

Above, you see Ben, gazing perplexedly at our climbing hydrangea.

5 comments:

Yolanda Elizabet said...

I'm checking on your blog too EAL. ;-) In my garden no pond yet, but that is because we are busy with another project in the garden. All will be revealed soon.

Christopher C. in Hawaii said...

This is not me being a stick in the muck, but are you wanting a pond that will have living plants or a pool that is cleaned water and more of a water feature?

Just from the two pictures you have shown of pond persons by a red brick wall I envision a more formal hardscape design with some kind of falling water for sound and not a natural looking pond with a waterfall.

Pond plants generally need lots of sun to do well.

EAL said...

Yeah, it's misleading. That's not even my house--it's the neighbors. It's just that the garden is so bleak now--hard for you in Hawaii to imagine this!--that I didn't want to show it. I have a few larger planted areas that would accomodate a small pond with plants. Lots of our urban gardens have ponds here; they offer a nice respite.

But to be honest, there is plenty of other design work that needs doing.

Kate said...

Ponds are great fun and don't have to be large and formal. A few plants, some fish and the sound of water does amazing things for the soul. We do the best we can with what we have to work with ...

chuck b. said...

It could be because I'm, ahem, intoxicated, but I just experienced that same word reductio ad abstractem with the word "tulip" in a comment at May Dreams.

That's just a ridiculous word, tulip.